Methane Hydrates: The Ice That Burns

Last week I had the pleasure of meeting Gal Luft, co-director of the Institute for the Analysis of Global Security (IAGS). It was a funny sort of meeting, because I didn’t know he was coming, as he had come to visit someone else. When I was introduced to him we both said to each other “Hey, don’t I know you?” ...

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Mini-Nuclear Reactors & The New Power Game

So the deed is finally done. After two years of wrangling over the size of the subsidies and a guaranteed production price the UK Government has sealed a £16 billion ($26bn) deal that will see two European Pressurized Reactors (EPRs) constructed at Hinckley Point C in Somerset. ...

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LA Times Bans Debate On Climate Change

The Los Angeles Times newspaper has announced it is banning anyone who opposes their view on climate change from publishing in the letters section of the newspaper. Paul Thornton, editor of the papers letters section said "Simply put, I do my best to keep factual errors off the letters page, when one does run, a correction is published." ...

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Forty Years Ago, Scarcity Was Our Reality

October 17 was the fortieth anniversary of the oil embargo slapped on America by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). That action changed the entire geopolitical map by taking the power from the United States and giving it to the Middle East. As a result of the embargo, America slid into a serious recession. ...

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Study Sheds Light on the Environmental Impact of Shale Gas

Since the late 1990s natural gas has been identified by both energy experts and environmentalists as a likely "bridge fuel" to facilitate the transition to cleaner energy sources. This view has recently been challenged by suggestions that methane leakage from natural gas systems--particularly from shale gas development--might be significant enough to negate the downstream climate benefits of switching to na ...

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China’s Shale Gas Ambitions Still Face Massive Hurdles

China is still pressing ahead with its shale gas ambitions though numerous hurdles continue to hinder those goals. Shale gas is supposed to boost the nation’s natural gas supply which is in dire need. China today draws about 4 percent of its energy needs from natural gas and more than 70 percent from coal. The coal figure is one that the West has not experienced since the nineteenth century. ...

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Carbon Capture and Storage: The Edsel of Energy Policies

The war on climate change has produced many dubious “innovations.” Intermittent wind and solar energy sources, carbon markets that buy and sell “hot air,” and biofuels that burn food as we drive are just a few examples. But carbon capture and storage is the Edsel of energy policies. ...

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Dismantling the West’s Energy-Climate Paradigm

Good governance is a rare thing. Government acting in the best and common interest of the people is nothing less than the highest democratic ideal. And yet, as history plainly reveals, government all too easily loses sight of its ‘representation of the people’ mandate, diverting instead down the path of elitist, theoretical and ultimately self-serving policies bereft of any sense of realpolitik. Take the We ...

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Why Gasoline Prices are Falling

Fall is always a welcome change of pace for most people after a long, hot summer. Not only from the temperatures, but fall almost always brings relief at the gasoline pump. Pundits frequently notice this phenomenon during election years, and assume that vested interests are trying to manipulate prices to win elections. But there is a more straightforward explanation to what’s going on, and it isn’t limited ...

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